Saturday, June 25, 2016

10 very particular Italian proverbs and their English equivalent


Here's a list of 10 Italian proverbs you need to know, along with their English equivalent. Italians sure do love animals!

Read the article below and compare it to the source text (the one with smaller letters) to see how I've translated words and expressions, then read my final tips and test your knowledge with a short exercise.


Words of wisdom: Top 10 Italian proverbs
Parole di saggezza: Top 10 dei proverbi italiani


The Italian language is loaded with colourful (and downright bizarre) ways to express a point. Here we've listed ten particularly imaginative pearls of wisdom.
La lingua italiana è tempestata di modi coloriti (e a volte completamente strampalati) di esprimere un concetto. Abbiamo fornito qui una lista di dieci perle di saggezza particolarmente fantasiose.


1. A ogni uccello il suo nido è bello. In English, the nearest meaning of this phrase is: "There is no place like home" - the mantra of Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz. The literal translation from the Italian, however, is rather more poetic "To every bird, his own nest is beautiful". 

1. A ogni uccello il suo nido è bello. In inglese, il significato che più si avvicina a questa frase è: “There is no place like home” - il mantra di Dorothy in Il mago di Oz. La traduzione letterale dall'italiano è tuttavia più poetica: “Ad ogni uccello il suo nido bello”. 

2. Acqua passata non macina più. “It's water under the bridge” you might say, to indicate that something's firmly in the past. The Italian version is a bit more complicated: “Water that's flowed past the mill grinds no more.”

2. Acqua passata non macina più. “It's water under the bridge” potremmo dire, per indicare che qualcosa è ancorato nel passato. La versione italiana è un po' più complicata: “Acqua passata non macina più.”

3. O mangiar questa minestra o saltar questa finestra. This is the Italian way of saying “Take it or leave it”. Literally, it's: “Either eat this soup or jump out of this window”, “minestra” symbolizing the daily grind. Pretty brutal, really - but at least the Italian version rhymes.
3. O mangiar questa minestra o saltar questa finestra. È la maniera italiana per dire “Take it or leave it”. La “minestra” simboleggia il tran tran quotidiano. Abbastanza brutale, davvero - ma almeno la versione italiana fa rima. 

4. La gatta frettolosa ha fatto i gattini ciechi. Literally: “The hasty cat gave birth to blind kittens”. So perhaps not the most refined way of saying that things done in haste tend to turn out badly. An English equivalent might be “haste makes waste”.
4. La gatta frettolosa ha fatto i gattini ciechi. Letteralmente: “The hasty cat gave birth to blind kittens”. Non è forse il modo più raffinato per dire che le cose fatte di fretta tendono ad andare male. Un equivalente inglese potrebbe essere “haste makes waste”.

5. Tanto va la gatta al lardo che ci lascia lo zampino. What is it about Italians and cats? This particular pearl of wisdom translates literally as: “The cat goes so often to the bacon that she loses her paw”. In other words, if you keep on doing the same bad thing over and over again, you'll get caught.

5. Tanto va la gatta al lardo che ci lascia lo zampino. Che avranno mai gli italiani coi gatti? Questa particolare perla di saggezza può essere tradotta letteralmente in: “The cat goes so often to the bacon that she loses her paw”. In altre parole, se continui a fare la stessa brutta cosa più e più volte, finirai per essere preso/a con le mani in pasta. 


6. Fai d'una mosca un elefante. If someone tells you: “Don't make a mountain out of a molehill” - what he means is that you shouldn't make a big deal out of a small matter. In Italian, the expression is: “To make an elephant out of a fly”.
6. Fai d'una mosca un elefante. Se qualcuno ti dice “Don't make a mountain out of a molehill” - ciò che vuol dire è che non dovresti ingigantire una piccola cosa. In italiano, l'espressione è: “To make an elephant out of a fly”.

7. Menare il can per l'aia. More animals. Italians who say that you're “leading the dog around the barnyard” are basically telling you not to beat around the bush. 
7. Menare il can per l'aia. Ancora animali. Gli italiani che dicono che stai “leading the dog around the barnyard” ti stanno dicendo in pratica di smettere di sprecare il tuo tempo.

8. Oggi in figura, domani in sepoltura. We all know the English saying: “here today, gone tomorrow”. Italians, however, are far more explicit: “Today in person, tomorrow in the grave”.
8. Oggi in figura, domani in sepoltura. Conosciamo tutti il detto inglese: “here today, gone tomorrow”. Gli italiani sono tuttavia molto più espliciti: “Today in person, tomorrow in the grave”.

9. A chi dai il dito si prende anche il braccio. “Give him an inch and he'll take a mile” is a familiar expression used for a person who's been given something, and then tries to get a whole lot more. In Italy, this kind of thing is viewed rather more personally: “Give them a finger and they'll take an arm.”

9. A chi dai il dito si prende anche il braccio. “Give him an inch and he'll take a mile” è un espressione familiare utilizzata per una persona a cui è stato dato qualcosa, e che prova ad ottenere molto di più. In Italia, questo tipo di cosa viene presa molto più sul personale: “Give them a finger and they'll take an arm.”

10. L'abito non fa il monaco. As you might expect, even Italian proverbs aren't immune from the influence of the Catholic Church. So, while English speakers say: “Clothes don't make the man,” Italians claim that “The habit doesn't make the monk”.
10. L'abito non fa il monaco. Come ci si potrebbe aspettare, persino i proverbi italiani non sono immuni dall'influenza della Chiesa cattolica. Quindi, mentre chi parla inglese dirà: “Clothes don't make the man,” gli italiani affermano che “The habit doesn't make the monk”.


 
Link to the source article / Link all'articolo originale: Words of wisdom: Top 10 Italian proverbs
Source / Fonte: The Local
Translator / Traduttore: Alexandro Piccione

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SPEAK ITALIAN LIKE A PRO - TIP #40

There's also another way of saying “Take it or leave it” in Italian besides “O mangiar questa minestra o saltar questa finestra” (which isn't a very common proverb):
  • Prendere o lasciare
Here's an example:

Ti offro 100 euro, prendere o lasciare
I'm offering you 100 euros, take it or leave it.

I also wanted to point out that proverb #9 and #10 are the most common ones of the list (the ones you are far more likely to hear in the streets of Italy). 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

TEST YOUR ITALIAN - EXERCISE #40

There are two very common proverbs missing from the Top 10. The first one concerning a zoppo (crippled) and another one starring a ladro (thief).

I want you to search these proverbs on the Internet and copy/paste them in the comment section along with a literal translation (and if you can, a similar proverb in your language as well). 

Have fun!

If you liked my article, you are welcome to share or like it. You can follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ if you wish to receive the latest updates. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you have any questions or you just want to chat, feel free to leave a comment in English or Italian. See you next week.

Per ogni eventuale domanda o considerazione sulla traduzione ti invito a lasciare un commento in lingua italiana o ingleseAlla prossima settimana.

No comments:

Post a Comment